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ENEMY OF THE ECONOMY
green economics
Image by SS&SS
The Obama Watch
Chamber Music in the Key of Big G
By Ross Kaminsky on 2.8.11 @ 6:08AM

President Barack Obama’s speech to the Chamber of Commerce (video & transcript) on Monday morning offered the latest example of a man who wants to appear to be moderating while remaining "same guy" he’s been for two years (or for his whole adult life), to support business while refusing to back away from Obamacare, the most job killing legislation in generations, and to want to cut government spending while offering reductions in discretionary spending that over the course of a decade save barely a quarter of this year’s federal budget deficit.

It was a speech full of the internal contradictions necessary from a man whose mindset has always been anti-capitalist and anti-compromise, and who is trying to reconcile those traits with the "shellacking" his party took in November.

The president began by acknowledging his tense relationship with the Chamber: "Maybe we would have gotten off on a better foot if I had brought over a fruitcake when we first moved in." Polite but unimpressed laughter ensued, as if the attendees knew what was coming next.

After two years of leaving business out in the cold during every major policy discussion costing a few hundred billion dollars or more, Obama claimed to have "exchanged ideas" and "sought advice from many" of the Chamber’s members. He claimed to have found "common cause" with the Chamber on the "Recovery Act" aka the "Stimulus" aka "Porkulous," but couldn’t name any other legislation passed under his Administration that the nation’s leading business organization supported, noting that "on other issues, we’ve had some pretty strong disagreements." You don’t say.

Obama lapsed into a brief history of economic competition and globalization, noting that "these forces are as unstoppable as they are powerful" before injecting the first evidence that he was telling the truth to Bill O’Reilly when he said "I haven’t" when asked whether he’s "moving to the center": "[Americans] see a widening chasm of wealth and opportunity in this country, and they wonder if the American Dream is slipping away." While recent polls emphasize huge declines in public satisfaction with both government and major corporations, there is no evidence of the sort of class warfare jealousy regarding a "chasm of wealth" that Barack Obama himself has currently accepted (as demonstrated by his words to Joe the Plumber and a later statement that "at a certain point you’ve made enough money").

Obama’s anti-capitalist view informs every policy preference and tinges even his most blatant attempt at economic "moderation" on his part.

It’s also worth noting that the decline in satisfaction with government is down more than satisfaction with corporations, and that much of the current fad of bashing companies comes from the anti-business cheerleaders at the White House and within the Democratic caucus in Congress.

The president then lapsed into the primary theme of the speech: a bland rehashing of the State of the Union address with another call to "out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build our competitors" in order to "win the future" — a phrase which Charles Krauthammer suggests will be Obama’s 2012 campaign bookend to "Yes, we can!" and the acronym for which, WTF, Sarah Palin cleverly appropriated.

And here is where the real Obama comes through.

He claims that "winning the future" is "a job for all of us," completely missing the point that what most businesses really want is for government to get out of the way, not "help" as it did with, for example, the residential real estate market or with Obamacare’s massive cost and impending regulatory burdens, or with his EPA’s desire to control most of the economy through regulating carbon dioxide, a non-toxic substance almost entirely naturally occurring, the primary use of which is as plant food.

Strangely, for a man who just a few minutes earlier had said that "businesses can now open up shop, employ workers and produce their goods wherever there is Internet connection," Obama then proposed "connecting 80 percent of the country to high-speed rail," a boondoggle so large that it could dwarf even the massive money pit that is "green energy." He also wants to "make it possible for companies to put high-speed Internet coverage in reach of virtually all Americans." Perhaps he doesn’t realize that that possibility already exists — and that government had almost nothing to do with it (except for our undying gratitude to Algore for inventing the Internet). As always with Obama, the answer is government.

But the worst part of Barack Obama’s speech was his attempt to channel President John F. Kennedy — the man who gave America its single largest federal income tax cut as a percentage of GDP (1.9%) and as a percentage of the federal budget (8.8%).

Warning businesses that they "also have a responsibility to America," Obama patronized: "But ultimately, winning the future is not just about what the government can do to help you succeed. It’s about what you can do to help America succeed."

It’s a telling statement, so desperately wrong in its underlying premises that the assembled CEOs must have wondered whether an American president could actually be so clueless. Well, they might have wondered had they not lived through the past two years.

First, future success should be as little about government as possible; Obama’s phrasing makes it clear that he believes government is at least as important as business in national economic success. Second — and I know our liberal friends and even some conservatives won’t like to hear this — businesses have a responsibility to their shareholders and employees. They don’t have a duty to the nation other than to abide by its laws. Instead, the actions of government should be such that they engender rational economic loyalty to the nation, much as Hong Kong and Singapore have among businesses domiciled there.

Obama spent minutes lecturing the CEOs that they should start spending the cash they’ve been hoarding due to regulatory and economic uncertainty that Obama has made much worse, not better. He jawboned them to hire more workers, implying that his efforts to rationalize America’s self-destructive corporate tax code would be conditioned on business acquiescence. After all, Obama knows that if the unemployment rate is 8% or higher in November 2012, our next president is very likely to be a Republican.

In speaking about lowering the corporate income tax rate, Obama specified that it would be in a deficit neutral way, meaning that many current loopholes would be closed. Eliminating the crony capitalism embedded in our tax code is a worthy goal. The problem is that the static modeling used by the CBO and all Democrats when discussing taxes means that they’ll ignore the economic growth — and thus the additional tax revenue — caused by lower corporate tax rates and thus not cut the rate as much as it should be cut. Given the power of each industry group’s lobby and the different treatment of each industry in our tax code, it will take a heroic effort to accomplish serious reform of the corporate tax system. It is, however, one of the few areas in which we should wish Obama success.

The president also spent time talking about "remov[ing] outdated and unnecessary regulations," continuing his sad-if-it-weren’t-so-damaging missing the point that nobody has contributed more damaging regulation in such a short period of time as he has (not that George W. Bush has anything to be proud of in this area).

But continuing to prove that he is indeed "the same guy," after giving a few examples of potential streamlining of regulation, Obama touted the virtue of regulation, from air and water rules to financial markets to "buying groceries" and essentially demonizing anyone who opposes regulation as ignorant child abusers. In other words, regulations should be simpler, but not that many fewer, and claimed good intentions trump all else.

A point that supporters of capitalism must keep in mind is that big business is not always, and perhaps not even most often, a champion of free markets. Unlike small businesses, which survive based on delivering a superior product or service for a given price — in other words, by competing — big businesses work hand in glove with government to crush competition (e.g. Net Neutrality) or funnel taxpayer money to themselves (e.g. the government’s ban on incandescent light bulbs, so that Obama’s friend Jeff Immelt of General Electric can sell us more overpriced, underperforming, toxic-if-they-break compact fluorescent bulbs). In short, do not assume that Chamber of Commerce or a major corporation’s approval of a government policy makes it a good idea — although it’s likely to be a better idea with their approval than without it if it originated in the Obama Administration.

Finally, as if to prove not only that he is economically clueless but that he idolizes such ignorance, the president closed his speech by lauding President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s "new partnership with business." Roosevelt is the second-most anti-capitalist president in our nation’s history (second only to our current president). His willingness to experiment (an approach he took explicitly) with the nation’s economy is, according to many who study economic history, what made the Great Depression so "great." Had Roosevelt not attacked corporations at every turn, the U.S. would likely have come out of the Depression much faster — as most of Europe did.

If Barack Obama’s economic role model is FDR, then we really are lost — for two more years. Given that Obama has said explicitly that he is not moving to the center, that he is "the same guy" he’s been all along, betting odds are strong that if the Administration does anything right in economic policy it will be despite, and over the objections of, the developed world’s most economically illiterate chief executive.

While Barack Obama probably intended his speech "to be seen over there [as] moderating," instead he simply proved to everyone that his rhetoric is mostly insincere and completely uninformed by history or economic common sense

MEANWHILE THE UNITED STATES DEBT CLOCK KEEPS RUNNING
www.usdebtclock.org/

spectator.org/

Cool Green Business Development images

Check out these Green Business Development images:

20110404 Hmong Village Recycling Award 130
Green Business Development
Image by RamseyCountyMN
Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

20110404 Hmong Village Recycling Award 142
Green Business Development
Image by RamseyCountyMN
Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

20110404 Hmong Village Recycling Award 112
Green Business Development
Image by RamseyCountyMN
Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Peru – Green Electricity in the Andes | Global 3000

Peru’s economy is growing, and so is its demand for electricity. Even so, almost 25 percent of the population lacks access to the national grid. Rural regions are now seeing a boom in renewable energy. A number of villages in Cajamarca in the Andes now rely on alternative energy supplies. Power masts are too costly for these remote areas, so the aid organization “Soluciones Practicas” has installed a range of micro wind turbines and solar systems instead – giving more than 6000 people access to electricity.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

George Galloway interviews Green Politician Darren Johnson over nuclear power

From BBC News: The government has identified eight sites in England and Wales as suitable for future nuclear power stations while ruling out a further three. Energy Secretary Chris Huhne said Dungeness in Kent and both Braystones and Kirksanton in Cumbria were not suitable for environmental reasons. While nuclear had a key role to play, he hoped half of all new capacity by 2025 would come from renewables. But he ruled out plans for a tidal energy scheme on the Severn estuary. Funding a Severn barrage with public money would be “very costly”, he said, and as finding private investment would be challenging, other options should be pursued. The last Labour government approved eleven locations as suitable for new nuclear plants by 2025 – most on the site of existing plants – but this has been cut to eight as part of a revised draft policy statement presented to Parliament on Monday. Urgent investment The possible locations are: Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex; Hartlepool; Heysham, Lancashire; Hinkley Point, Somerset; Oldbury, Gloucestershire; Sellafield, Cumbria; Sizewell, Suffolk and Wylfa on the Isle of Anglesey. The BBC’s Environmental Analyst Roger Harrabin said this did not mean the projects – which would be subject to planning permission – would go ahead as Mr Huhne has insisted there would be no public subsidies available for them. Nuclear power is a potential flashpoint within the coalition government with many leading Lib Dems sceptical about the merits of a new generation of
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Nice Green Economics photos

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Saguaro
green economics
Image by frank3.0
I can’t say enough good things about the group of guys with whom I spent the last few days in Baja. Our host, Erwan, has a little Airstream on a cliff above a pristine beach, right next to some of the best wind surfing and kite boarding water on the Sea of Cortez. I had met Erwan once before at one of James and Ashley’s famous pizza parties up in Saint Francisville. But, only after I went on some rant about economics did Erwan recall that we had sat by the pizza oven and shared a few beers. What can I say? I guess I am most memorable when I am rambling about some subject that I probably have no business speaking on.

The tip of the Baja peninsula was socked in with the same cold front that had Dallas and the rest of the south in its teeth when we landed in San Jose de Cabo at around 10:30PM on Thursday. We rented two small cars to accommodate all of the kite boarding gear and then set out for a two hour drive, late-night drive through the Mexican desert. Only when the sun rose on our frosty sleeping bags the next morning did I get a full picture of what the fuss was about. The landscape and sea were stunning. The water varied from deep turquoise to the faintest blue-green. The saguaro needled desert ran straight down to the water, sometimes in dramatic cliffs and sometimes along the bed on dry arroyos. Erwan had found himself an acre or two of paradise. The area is unspoiled, largely owing to its isolation. A good, paved road had just been put in a few year back. So, the little bungalows and palapa toped cabanas there had been constructed by folks who truly wanted to be in that spot. One did not accidentally find themselves in La Ventana. A person had to make a point of seeking out this windy bay near the point where the Sea of Cortez flows into the Pacific.

Those that had found these beaches and waves just a few miles north of the Tropic of Cancer had come for the wind. Being a rather poor swimmer, I am not a kite boarder or wind surfer or much of one for water sports in general, but those who apparently know say the conditions around La Ventana are ideal. You can find a spotty internet connection, there are few roadside, fish taco stands and the occasional tiendita selling Pacifico beer in large, bomb-like brown bottles. But, this area is most certainly not geared toward the idle tourist. I could not even locate any postcards to send to the friends who are accustomed to my regular mailings. It just isn’t that sort of spot. And so much the better.

Down the road a bit, some enterprising soul has but in a high-end cabana hotel where the little outbuildings rent for around 0 a day but the folks you see flying along the water, attached to the lunatic combination of a parachute and a surfboard, are more likely to be living out of a camper or renting a bit of thatch for . The slow-growing saguaro cactus, a visual icon of the American southwest but now largely gone because of development, abound here. The salty flat between Los Barilles and La Ventana is a forest of these alien looking monoliths. Raptors and vultures rides the thermal winds cooked up by the combination of sand and sun. Laughing gulls and pelicans bob on the cresting waves. In short, its is about as un-spoiled an area as you can find that also provides running water. The throbbing clubs and all-inclusive resorts of Cabo san Lucas feel about a million miles away.

I could go on about how precious this spot seemed to me or about how much I enjoyed sharing coffee with Bob, Erwan and James as the sun rose, orange and purple, over these little fingers of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains. But, I think you get the idea. I’ll just close by thanking Erwan for his hospitality and for putting it all together, Bob for his endlessly positive embrace of life and its questions and to James for introducing me to these fine folks and this lovely part of the world. It was a trip I won’t forget.

Check out more at my blog, Lemons and Beans, for lots of photos, recipes, travel writing and other ramblings. I appreciate any feedback but, please do not post graphic awards or invitations in your comments.

Erwan’s Getaway
green economics
Image by frank3.0
I can’t say enough good things about the group of guys with whom I spent the last few days in Baja. Our host, Erwan, has a little Airstream on a cliff above a pristine beach, right next to some of the best wind surfing and kite boarding water on the Sea of Cortez. I had met Erwan once before at one of James and Ashley’s famous pizza parties up in Saint Francisville. But, only after I went on some rant about economics did Erwan recall that we had sat by the pizza oven and shared a few beers. What can I say? I guess I am most memorable when I am rambling about some subject that I probably have no business speaking on.

The tip of the Baja peninsula was socked in with the same cold front that had Dallas and the rest of the south in its teeth when we landed in San Jose de Cabo at around 10:30PM on Thursday. We rented two small cars to accommodate all of the kite boarding gear and then set out for a two hour drive, late-night drive through the Mexican desert. Only when the sun rose on our frosty sleeping bags the next morning did I get a full picture of what the fuss was about. The landscape and sea were stunning. The water varied from deep turquoise to the faintest blue-green. The saguaro needled desert ran straight down to the water, sometimes in dramatic cliffs and sometimes along the bed on dry arroyos. Erwan had found himself an acre or two of paradise. The area is unspoiled, largely owing to its isolation. A good, paved road had just been put in a few year back. So, the little bungalows and palapa toped cabanas there had been constructed by folks who truly wanted to be in that spot. One did not accidentally find themselves in La Ventana. A person had to make a point of seeking out this windy bay near the point where the Sea of Cortez flows into the Pacific.

Those that had found these beaches and waves just a few miles north of the Tropic of Cancer had come for the wind. Being a rather poor swimmer, I am not a kite boarder or wind surfer or much of one for water sports in general, but those who apparently know say the conditions around La Ventana are ideal. You can find a spotty internet connection, there are few roadside, fish taco stands and the occasional tiendita selling Pacifico beer in large, bomb-like brown bottles. But, this area is most certainly not geared toward the idle tourist. I could not even locate any postcards to send to the friends who are accustomed to my regular mailings. It just isn’t that sort of spot. And so much the better.

Down the road a bit, some enterprising soul has but in a high-end cabana hotel where the little outbuildings rent for around 0 a day but the folks you see flying along the water, attached to the lunatic combination of a parachute and a surfboard, are more likely to be living out of a camper or renting a bit of thatch for . The slow-growing saguaro cactus, a visual icon of the American southwest but now largely gone because of development, abound here. The salty flat between Los Barilles and La Ventana is a forest of these alien looking monoliths. Raptors and vultures rides the thermal winds cooked up by the combination of sand and sun. Laughing gulls and pelicans bob on the cresting waves. In short, its is about as un-spoiled an area as you can find that also provides running water. The throbbing clubs and all-inclusive resorts of Cabo san Lucas feel about a million miles away.

I could go on about how precious this spot seemed to me or about how much I enjoyed sharing coffee with Bob, Erwan and James as the sun rose, orange and purple, over these little fingers of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains. But, I think you get the idea. I’ll just close by thanking Erwan for his hospitality and for putting it all together, Bob for his endlessly positive embrace of life and its questions and to James for introducing me to these fine folks and this lovely part of the world. It was a trip I won’t forget.

Check out more at my blog, Lemons and Beans, for lots of photos, recipes, travel writing and other ramblings. I appreciate any feedback but, please do not post graphic awards or invitations in your comments.

Cool Green Business Development images

Check out these Green Business Development images:

20110404 Hmong Village Recycling Award 131
Green Business Development
Image by RamseyCountyMN
Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

20110404 Hmong Village Recycling Award 061
Green Business Development
Image by RamseyCountyMN
Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

20110404 Hmong Village Recycling Award 001
Green Business Development
Image by RamseyCountyMN
Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Ramsey County has recognized Hmong Village on St. Paul’s East Side for its work to recycle and reduce food waste. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section has worked with Hmong Village’s owners and businesses to set up a successful recycling program that has collected more than 1,100 barrels of food waste for use at a local hog farm.

Ramsey County Commissioner Jim McDonough presented a recognition award to Hmong Village’s developers for their support of recycling efforts on Monday, April 4.

Hmong Village, 1001 Johnson Parkway, is a multi-use development that opened last year in a building formerly operated by the Saint Paul Schools. The development has more than 200 merchant stalls, 40 offices, 35 produce booths and 17 restaurants. Ramsey County’s Environmental Health Section partnered with Hmong Village’s owners to help set up, and provide training, for businesses to collect food waste, and other recyclables.

Cool Green Business Development images

Check out these Green Business Development images:

Entrepreneurship and the Green Economy
Green Business Development
Image by US Mission Geneva
Ambassador Betty E. King opened the U.S. Mission’s Earth Day Panel remarking that innovation and entrepreneurship are critical to economic growth and to the transition to a green economy.

Katherine Milligan of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship presented the concept of social entrepreneurship and how its network of ent…repreneurs operate in the green economy. Milligan moderated a Skype discussion with Recycla in Chile and Waste Concern in Bangladesh, companies focused on recycling and waste management, with ecological-minded and forward-looking business models.

The U.S. Mission also hosted a panel with representatives from the World Economic Forum, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and Bamboo Finance. The panelists discussed the challenges to and opportunities arising from transitioning to a green economy with a particular focus on finance, policy and private sector involvement.

Photo Credit: U.S. Mission / Pam Proctor

Entrepreneurship and the Green Economy
Green Business Development
Image by US Mission Geneva
Ambassador Betty E. King opened the U.S. Mission’s Earth Day Panel remarking that innovation and entrepreneurship are critical to economic growth and to the transition to a green economy.

Katherine Milligan of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship presented the concept of social entrepreneurship and how its network of ent…repreneurs operate in the green economy. Milligan moderated a Skype discussion with Recycla in Chile and Waste Concern in Bangladesh, companies focused on recycling and waste management, with ecological-minded and forward-looking business models.

The U.S. Mission also hosted a panel with representatives from the World Economic Forum, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and Bamboo Finance. The panelists discussed the challenges to and opportunities arising from transitioning to a green economy with a particular focus on finance, policy and private sector involvement.

Photo Credit: U.S. Mission / Pam Proctor

Cool Green Business Development images

A few nice Green Business Development images I found:

20110504-RD-LSC-0679
Green Business Development
Image by USDAgov
Cooper Vineyards vineyard manager Michael Boone in Louisa, VA, on May 4, 2011, the first winery on the East Coast and the second in the country to be awarded the fourth and highest, Platinum certification by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).
From a Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office press release, “The process of building a LEED platinum certified building was initially more expensive and arduous than co-owners, Jacque Hogge, MD and Geoffrey Cooper, MD expected, but they were able to get financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture. “Know that there are grants available to help with the costs of sustainable building projects,” Hogge advises to other potential green wineries. Cooper Vineyards received 2 of the 3 USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) Rural Energy Financing program) grants awarded in Virginia in 2010 to help with the expenses of their construction.”
Rural Energy Financing program focuses on loan guarantees, loans and grants to agricultural producers, businesses, cooperatives and rural residents for renewable energy systems and to make energy efficiency improvements.
The tasting room and building collects rainwater from the roof; uses low flow water fixtures to reduce usage by 40%; utilizes structurally insulated panels for the roof and walls; heats and cools the entire building using a geothermal system that includes pipes that are embedded in the parking lot; low-voltage LED lighting with daylight and occupancy sensors provide ample light when it is needed; a solar panel array provides more than 15% of the energy needs for the building, and much of the construction materials are from local and recycled material sources. For more information about USDA please go to www.usda.gov, Rural Development and Rural Energy Financing. LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a 501 c3 non-profit organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

20110506-RD-LSC-1155
Green Business Development
Image by USDAgov
Grape vines and photovoltaic panels (r.) rely on the sun at Cooper Vineyards in Louisa, VA, the first winery on the East Coast and the second in the country to be awarded the fourth and highest, Platinum certification by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).
From a Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office press release, “The process of building a LEED platinum certified building was initially more expensive and arduous than co-owners, Jacque Hogge, MD and Geoffrey Cooper, MD expected, but they were able to get financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture. “Know that there are grants available to help with the costs of sustainable building projects,” Hogge advises to other potential green wineries. Cooper Vineyards received 2 of the 3 USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) Rural Energy Financing program) grants awarded in Virginia in 2010 to help with the expenses of their construction.”
Rural Energy Financing program focuses on loan guarantees, loans and grants to agricultural producers, businesses, cooperatives and rural residents for renewable energy systems and to make energy efficiency improvements.
The tasting room and building collects rainwater from the roof; uses low flow water fixtures to reduce usage by 40%; utilizes structurally insulated panels for the roof and walls; heats and cools the entire building using a geothermal system that includes pipes that are embedded in the parking lot; low-voltage LED lighting with daylight and occupancy sensors provide ample light when it is needed; a solar panel array provides more than 15% of the energy needs for the building, and much of the construction materials are from local and recycled material sources. For more information about USDA please go to www.usda.gov, Rural Development and Rural Energy Financing. LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a 501 c3 non-profit organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

20110506-RD-LSC-1170
Green Business Development
Image by USDAgov
Grape vines and photovoltaic panels (r.) rely on the sun at Cooper Vineyards in Louisa, VA, the first winery on the East Coast and the second in the country to be awarded the fourth and highest, Platinum certification by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).
From a Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office press release, “The process of building a LEED platinum certified building was initially more expensive and arduous than co-owners, Jacque Hogge, MD and Geoffrey Cooper, MD expected, but they were able to get financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture. “Know that there are grants available to help with the costs of sustainable building projects,” Hogge advises to other potential green wineries. Cooper Vineyards received 2 of the 3 USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) Rural Energy Financing program) grants awarded in Virginia in 2010 to help with the expenses of their construction.”
Rural Energy Financing program focuses on loan guarantees, loans and grants to agricultural producers, businesses, cooperatives and rural residents for renewable energy systems and to make energy efficiency improvements.
The tasting room and building collects rainwater from the roof; uses low flow water fixtures to reduce usage by 40%; utilizes structurally insulated panels for the roof and walls; heats and cools the entire building using a geothermal system that includes pipes that are embedded in the parking lot; low-voltage LED lighting with daylight and occupancy sensors provide ample light when it is needed; a solar panel array provides more than 15% of the energy needs for the building, and much of the construction materials are from local and recycled material sources. For more information about USDA please go to www.usda.gov, Rural Development and Rural Energy Financing. LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a 501 c3 non-profit organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

Cool Green Business Development images

Check out these Green Business Development images:

20110504-RD-LSC-0591
Green Business Development
Image by USDAgov
Water treatment system at Cooper Vineyards in Louisa, VA, the first winery on the East Coast and the second in the country to be awarded the fourth and highest, Platinum certification by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).
From a Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office press release, “The process of building a LEED platinum certified building was initially more expensive and arduous than co-owners, Jacque Hogge, MD and Geoffrey Cooper, MD expected, but they were able to get financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture. “Know that there are grants available to help with the costs of sustainable building projects,” Hogge advises to other potential green wineries. Cooper Vineyards received 2 of the 3 USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) Rural Energy Financing program) grants awarded in Virginia in 2010 to help with the expenses of their construction.”
Rural Energy Financing program focuses on loan guarantees, loans and grants to agricultural producers, businesses, cooperatives and rural residents for renewable energy systems and to make energy efficiency improvements.
The tasting room and building collects rainwater from the roof; uses low flow water fixtures to reduce usage by 40%; utilizes structurally insulated panels for the roof and walls; heats and cools the entire building using a geothermal system that includes pipes that are embedded in the parking lot; low-voltage LED lighting with daylight and occupancy sensors provide ample light when it is needed; a solar panel array provides more than 15% of the energy needs for the building, and much of the construction materials are from local and recycled material sources. For more information about USDA please go to www.usda.gov, Rural Development and Rural Energy Financing. LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a 501 c3 non-profit organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

20110504-RD-LSC-0584
Green Business Development
Image by USDAgov
The water treatment system at Cooper Vineyards in Louisa, VA, the first winery on the East Coast and the second in the country to be awarded the fourth and highest, Platinum certification by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).
From a Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office press release, “The process of building a LEED platinum certified building was initially more expensive and arduous than co-owners, Jacque Hogge, MD and Geoffrey Cooper, MD expected, but they were able to get financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture. “Know that there are grants available to help with the costs of sustainable building projects,” Hogge advises to other potential green wineries. Cooper Vineyards received 2 of the 3 USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) Rural Energy Financing program) grants awarded in Virginia in 2010 to help with the expenses of their construction.”
Rural Energy Financing program focuses on loan guarantees, loans and grants to agricultural producers, businesses, cooperatives and rural residents for renewable energy systems and to make energy efficiency improvements.
The tasting room and building collects rainwater from the roof; uses low flow water fixtures to reduce usage by 40%; utilizes structurally insulated panels for the roof and walls; heats and cools the entire building using a geothermal system that includes pipes that are embedded in the parking lot; low-voltage LED lighting with daylight and occupancy sensors provide ample light when it is needed; a solar panel array provides more than 15% of the energy needs for the building, and much of the construction materials are from local and recycled material sources. For more information about USDA please go to www.usda.gov, Rural Development and Rural Energy Financing. LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a 501 c3 non-profit organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

20110506-RD-LSC-1129
Green Business Development
Image by USDAgov
Daniel Powell tends to guests at Cooper Vineyards in Louisa, VA, the first winery on the East Coast and the second in the country to be awarded the fourth and highest, Platinum certification by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).
From a Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office press release, “The process of building a LEED platinum certified building was initially more expensive and arduous than co-owners, Jacque Hogge, MD and Geoffrey Cooper, MD expected, but they were able to get financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture. “Know that there are grants available to help with the costs of sustainable building projects,” Hogge advises to other potential green wineries. Cooper Vineyards received 2 of the 3 USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) Rural Energy Financing program) grants awarded in Virginia in 2010 to help with the expenses of their construction.”
Rural Energy Financing program focuses on loan guarantees, loans and grants to agricultural producers, businesses, cooperatives and rural residents for renewable energy systems and to make energy efficiency improvements.
The tasting room and building collects rainwater from the roof; uses low flow water fixtures to reduce usage by 40%; utilizes structurally insulated panels for the roof and walls; heats and cools the entire building using a geothermal system that includes pipes that are embedded in the parking lot; low-voltage LED lighting with daylight and occupancy sensors provide ample light when it is needed; a solar panel array provides more than 15% of the energy needs for the building, and much of the construction materials are from local and recycled material sources. For more information about USDA please go to www.usda.gov, Rural Development and Rural Energy Financing. LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is a 501 c3 non-profit organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

Green Philanthropy For Families: 160 Simple Earth Honoring Gifts, Actions, Activities and Projects by Helen, Justin, and Alexis Deffenbacher

Green Philanthropy For Families: 160 Simple Earth Honoring Gifts, Actions, Activities and Projects by Helen, Justin, and Alexis Deffenbacher











Omaha, Nebraska (PRWEB) June 7, 2010

Green Philanthropy For Families expands the meaning of “philanthropy” to include care for all life on Earth. The book and the website on which it’s based aren’t for families only—they’re also for individuals, nature clubs, school sustainability programs, giving circles, and other groups. There are twelve chapters, one for each category of green philanthropy included in it. Readers can choose to begin in their own homes or in their own backyards or with a gift, action, activity or project that involves community or global outreach.

Examples of simple, no/low-cost green philanthropy ideas from the book include: 1. Provide a micro agricultural or environmental loan of $ 25 to an entrepreneur anywhere in the world through Kiva.Org. 2. Give family and friends lots of “Green Hours,” with the goals of nurturing love and respect for the Earth and the desire to sustain all life on it. 3. Adopt a local farm and purchase a crop-share for approximately $ 15 to $ 20 a week. 4. Plant a rainforest tree for $ 10. 5. Give a Solar Cooker Kit to a family housed in a refugee camp.

Besides redefining “philanthropy” to include respect and care for all life on Earth, additional goals for the book and website are: to demonstrate that the small things we do matter, and that one person or one gift, project, or action not only matter but, collectively, can change the world; to show that green philanthropy doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive and that we can easily involve our future conservationists and environmentalists–our children and grandchildren—in what we love and respect.

In large and small ways people of all ages in every part of the world are engaged in green philanthropy, providing a wealth of ideas, inspiration, and hope for others. Green Philanthropy For Families is a collection of 160 simple ways in which everyone can practice random acts of kindness toward Earth and its inhabitants and for which only a small amount of money—or none at all—is required.

Helen Deffenbacher is a volunteer for the Green Omaha Coalition and a founding member of the Omaha chapter of Slow Food USA. She and her husband Ken, a retired professor, enjoy their roles as ecostewards in their local community and opportunities to work with people of all ages, including their older grandkids Justin and Alexis with whom Helen has co-authored Green Philanthropy For Families. A number of their gifts, projects, and actions are contained in the book. Helen has a master’s degree in education.

Justin Deffenbacher received the youth social justice service award in his church’s eight-state region for co-founding an ecology club run by and for youth. When he was a member of a community service group in his school called Project Citizen, his idea of providing healthier foods in the schools was chosen by club members and his group was among several that presented their projects to Governor Dave Heineman. He enjoys volunteering for service projects, especially prairie restoration and preservation. Currently he’s collecting used books for a local Reach Out and Read program.

Alexis Deffenbacher joined the youth ecology club in her church when it was first formed and signed up for various projects including selling Fair Trade chocolates, making posters to educate church members about Fair Trade, and volunteering for the club’s “Adopt-a-Trail” cleanup at Standing Bear Lake. She has volun-teered for the Omaha Humane Society and for the Henry Doorley Zoo’s project of creating a butterfly garden on the zoo’s grounds. She is presently collecting eyeglasses for Lions’ Recycle for Sight program.

Back Cover

“That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics.”

Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

This book contains 160 no/low-cost green philanthropy ideas for families, individuals, and groups. You can choose to begin in your own home or in your own backyard or with a gift, action, activity or project that involves community or global outreach.

Wherever you decide to start, there are green philanthropy ideas appropriate for everyone in your family or group. Some are specifically geared toward youth or adults, but most can involve all ages.

A single random act of green philanthropy may not seem significant alone, but when it’s multiplied tens of thousands or a million times over it brings big results, saving: small farms, urban habitats, parks and refuges, organic foods, community gardens, native and heirloom seeds, wild places, wildlife, the ancient mountains of Appalachia, forests and rainforests, rivers, lakes, and streams and more. To share your own green philanthropy ideas, visit:

http://www.greenphilanthropyforfamilies.org

Publisher: Green Philanthropy For Families.Org – Published May 01, 2010

ISBN: 9780615331157    

130 pages – $ 10.95

Printed by Lightning Source & distributed by its partners: Ingram, Baker & Taylor, Bertram’s, Gardner’s, Blackwell Book Services, Cypher Library Supplier, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, The Book Depository, and Paperbackshop.co.uk.

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