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Tim Ogborn Appointed VP and Managing Director, PCI DC

Tim Ogborn Appointed VP and Managing Director, PCI DC











Tim Ogborn, PCI’s new VP & Managing Director, DC


San Diego, CA (PRWEB) August 29, 2013

PCI (Project Concern International) has appointed Tim Ogborn as Vice President and Managing Director of their Washington DC office. Ogborn brings over 30 years of experience in leading and managing programs and organizations focused on the food security, sustainable agriculture and livelihoods sectors.

At PCI, Tim Ogborn will be responsible for developing and strengthening relationships with key stakeholders on the East Coast as well as globally, enhancing the organization’s visibility and influence in the region as well as leading the organization’s technical team based in DC.

Prior to joining PCI, Ogborn was the Senior Vice President of Programs for Counterpart International where he was responsible for managing a portfolio of $ 63 million, covering fields such as government and civil society strengthening, food security and environmental sustainability. He was a key leader of Counterpart’s strategy development process and managed the implementation of a series of systems to address the organization’s rapid growth.

Prior to Counterpart International, Ogborn also held the position of Associate Vice President Livelihoods at Save the Children where he was responsible for technical and policy leadership, policy analysis, technical program quality, governmental relations and new business development for Livelihoods and Food Security. Ogborn has also held various senior-level and consultancy positions with Heifer International, TechnoServe, WHY Hunger and World Bank.

“Tim is a well-respected development professional with the experience we’ve been looking for in this key leadership position,” says George Guimaraes, President and CEO of PCI. “This role is critical to PCI’s efforts on the East Coast and I am enthusiastic about how Tim will help position PCI globally.”

Tim received his MS in Agricultural Engineering from the Cranfield Institute of Technology in the UK and graduated with honors from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne while obtaining a BS in Mathematics.

To learn more about PCI and its global health and humanitarian work, please visit http://www.PCIglobal.org or please contact Bonnie Maratea, Senior Marketing & Communications Manager, at (858) 279-9690.

###

PCI (Project Concern International) is an international health, development and humanitarian assistance organization, operating in 16 countries worldwide. PCI is dedicated to saving lives and building healthy communities around the globe, benefitting over 6.7 million people annually in Asia, Africa and the Americas. Funded by federal grants and private support, PCI celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2011. PCI’s headquarters are located in San Diego, CA and the organization also has an office in Washington, DC and a Seattle, WA representative. PCI’s current annual budget is nearly $ 50 million and the organization has over 600 employees worldwide.























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Overview of Land O’Lakes International Development

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Weight Loss Services in Australia Industry Market Research Report Now Updated by IBISWorld

Weight Loss Services in Australia Industry Market Research Report Now Updated by IBISWorld











IBISWorld Market Research


Melbourne, Australia (PRWEB) August 27, 2013

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, more than 70.0% of Australian males and 56.2% of females are overweight or obese. For both health and cosmetic reasons, there is growing pressure on Australians to change this statistic. An ever-growing amount of consumer spending is being directed towards getting thinner and healthier. IBISWorld industry analyst Alen Allday states “during 2013-14, Australians are estimated to spend $ 643.7 million on weight-loss counselling services, low-calorie foods and dietary supplements in their quests to slim down.” This is up 3.6% from the previous year, and with annualised growth of 2.8% over the past five years. Stronger industry growth has returned in 2012-13 and 2013-14 following two years of low growth in 2010-11 and 2011-12, when uncertain consumers cut back on discretionary spending.

Growth for the Weight Loss Services industry continues to be driven by its traditionally prominent companies, such as Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig. However, competitors such as Lite n’ Easy and Tony Ferguson have also gained market share through the development of new dietary products and services. According to Allday, “Australians are seeking out innovative, convenient and more effective methods of weight loss than those that have been on the market for some time.” Opinions are mixed regarding the effectiveness of low-fat foods that have high-sugar content, and the role exercise plays in long-term weight loss without reducing sugar consumption. Another key trend has been the move by traditional weight-loss companies towards the development of low-calorie or fat-free food, drinks and supplements, and the incorporation of these products into their counselling services.

The two largest weight-loss companies, Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig, are well-known operators in the Weight Loss Services industry and offer a range of weight-loss products and services. As Australians continue to spend more on weight-loss solutions, there has been a steady supply of new products and services. There has been a steady increase in the number of smaller competitors entering the market to capture some market share from the large firms. There has been a large increase in the number of online companies offering quick-fix weight-loss pills and solutions, as well as online targeting of potential customers to these products. However, industry associations, medical experts and consumer groups have questioned the veracity and legitimacy of many of these products, with the largest companies tending to overcome many of these competitors. This has resulted in industry concentration increasing in the past five years. The major industry players are Nestle Australia (Jenny Craig), Weight Watchers and Lite n’ Easy. For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Weight Loss Services report in Australia industry page.

Follow IBISWorld on Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/ibisworldau

IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

Weight-loss providers include any company offering goods or services specifically targeted as a weight-loss solution. As well as traditional weight-loss advice and counselling services, companies offer a variety of foods and beverages targeted at those wishing to lose weight. This industry does not include gyms, personal trainers and other exercise-oriented companies.

Industry Performance

Executive Summary

Key External Drivers

Current Performance

Industry Outlook

Industry Life Cycle

Products & Markets

Supply Chain

Products & Services

Major Markets

International Trade

Business Locations

Competitive Landscape

Market Share Concentration

Key Success Factors

Cost Structure Benchmarks

Basis of Competition

Barriers to Entry

Industry Globalisation

Major Companies

Operating Conditions

Capital Intensity

Technology & Systems

Revenue Volatility

Regulation & Policy

Industry Assistance

Key Statistics

Industry Data

Annual Change

Key Ratios

About IBISWorld Inc.

Recognised as the nation’s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every Australian industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Melbourne, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organisations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com.au or call (03) 9655 3886.























Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.









More International Development Policy Press Releases

What are examples of the elements of Quality Control System and the activities of analytical testing?

Question by as57: What are examples of the elements of Quality Control System and the activities of analytical testing?
Our company will be audited by European Medicines Agency this coming May. They asked, “What are the elements of our quality control system? What are the activities of analytical testing, packaging and component testing?” I have a hard time to understand the content of the questions. I was wondering they expect answers, such as calibration verification, and verification of method performance specifications for the first question, and evaluation of analytical methods for the second. If someone can give me some example, that would be a big help. Thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by sixsigmaboss
Yes, you need help fast and this space does not contain enough room to answer everything that you need to get ready for – however, maybe I can get you started –

I am an IRCA QMS 2000 Lead Auditor and very much understand what is being ask!

First – reference materials that you should be aware of:

European Quality Award – http://www.efqm.org/
Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award – http://www.quality.nist.gov/
ISO – Quality Management System (QMS) 9000 series – http://www.iso.org/iso/home.htm
American Society for Quality (ASQ) – http://www.asq.org

The EFQM and Baldrige are quality awards – these look at the best of the best organizations.

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards (which is similar to what you are going through) is set up on a base level that any company or organization should be able to meet.

Your goal should be to get somewhere between what the standards are asking for and the top-level quality awards. The probability is that your organization is already doing a lot of thing very good – also called customer satisfaction.

Now for the quality control system (also called a quality management system). The ISO 9000 series breaks this up into five categories: Quality Manual; Quality Management; Resource Management; Product Realization and the Measurement System. The auditors want to first see what type of a documented system you have to control the overall processes for the business that you are in.

So if you are making some kind of a widget, how has your organization planned to produce what is wanted by the customer, the steps that are gone through to actually make the widget including any product testing of supplier parts or actual components and how the widgets are packaged, shipped and delivered to the customer so that no damage is done to the widget. Once all that is done, how do you know that the customer likes what you sold to them?

Ideally, what you need is some form of documentation (keep is as simple as possible) using the outline of the ISO 9001:2008 below

4 Quality management system
4.1 General requirements
4.2 Documentation requirements
4.2.1 General
4.2.2 Quality manual
4.2.3 Control of documents
4.2.4 Control of records

5 Management responsibility
5.1 Management commitment
5.2 Customer focus
5.3 Quality policy
5.4 Planning
5.4.1 Quality objectives
5.4.2 Quality management system planning
5.5 Responsibility, authority and communication
5.5.1 Responsibility and authority
5.5.2 Management representative
5.5.3 Internal communication
5.6 Management review
5.6.1 General
5.6.2 Review input
5.6.3 Review output

6 Resource management
6.1 Provision of resources
6.2 Human resources
6.2.1 General
6.2.2 Competence, awareness and training
6.3 Infrastructure
6.4 Work environment

7 Product realization
7.1 Planning of product realization
7.2 Customer-related processes
7.2.1 Determination of requirements related to the product
7.2.2 Review of requirements related to the product
7.2.3 Customer communication
7.3 Design and development
7.3.1 Design and development planning
7.3.2 Design and development inputs
7.3.3 Design and development outputs
7.3.4 Design and development review
7.3.5 Design and development verification
7.3.6 Design and development validation
7.3.7 Control of design and development changes
7.4 Purchasing
7.4.1 Purchasing process
7.4.2 Purchasing information
7.4.3 Verification of purchased product
7.5 Production and service provision
7.5.1 Control of production and service provision
7.5.2 Validation of processes for production and service provision
7.5.3 Identification and traceability
7.5.4 Customer property
7.5.5 Preservation of product
7.6 Control of monitoring and measuring devices

8 Measurement, analysis and improvement
8.1 General
8.2 Monitoring and measurement
8.2.1 Customer satisfaction
8.2.2 Internal audit
8.2.3 Monitoring and measurement of processes
8.2.4 Monitoring and measurement of product
8.3 Control of nonconforming product
8.4 Analysis of data
8.5 Improvement
8.5.1 Continual improvement
8.5.2 Corrective action
8.5.3 Preventive action

Again, this is your starting point. The next thing will be to show the auditors how you are continually improving the companies system to do better!

What do you think? Answer below!

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Q&A: Does anybody know any good Humnanitarian training to help in developing countries?

Question by Sojourner: Does anybody know any good Humnanitarian training to help in developing countries?
I don’t want to go to a college but training programs. I want to help the forgotten and get to know them. Help people improve their lives and spirits. Missionary work is a big possibility for me aswell. I want a life of adventure. Any training schools you suggest? Like an all in one training? Hope it’s not hard.

Best answer:

Answer by Adan
Try this website. This is an excellent training program for missionaries. The program you are interested in is Globalworx. Ask for Fr. Aidan http://www.vrcusa.com/SJS/Welcome.html

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Building Youth-Inclusive Democracies: Lessons from Kenya
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
In partnership with the International Youth Foundation
THURSDAY, MAR 14, 2013
A discussion with:
Earl Gast
Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development
Zipporah Maina
President, Cheptiret Youth Bunge
Silas Maru
President, National Youth Bunge Association
Sharon Morris
Director of Youth and Conflict Mitigation, Mercy Corps
Moderated by:
Nicole Goldin
Director, Youth Prosperity and Security Initative, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Thursday, March 14, 2013 3:00pm-4:30pm
B1 Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K. St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to ppd@csis.org
Young people have historically been at the forefront of social and political movements. In Kenya, youth make up nearly 30% of the population, and are a source of great promise. Yet fueled by disenfranchisement, inequity, and rampant unemployment, youth were at the center of the violence following the 2007 Presidential elections. To begin to address the challenge of disaffected youth, USAID initiated its largest-ever youth program – Yes Youth Can!. Implemented by Mercy Corps and led by Kenyan youth, the Yes Youth Can! project is forging new ground in understanding and advancing youth inclusive democracy and governance.
Following the March 4th elections, please join us for a timely conversation on project, policy and comparative experiences, perspectives and lessons learned from Kenya in building youth inclusive democracies.
Follow @CSIS and #CSISLive for live updates
Programs
PACIFIC FORUM CSIS, PROJECT ON PROSPERITY AND DEVELOPMENT

Building Youth-Inclusive Democracies: Lessons from Kenya
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
In partnership with the International Youth Foundation
THURSDAY, MAR 14, 2013
A discussion with:
Earl Gast
Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development
Zipporah Maina
President, Cheptiret Youth Bunge
Silas Maru
President, National Youth Bunge Association
Sharon Morris
Director of Youth and Conflict Mitigation, Mercy Corps
Moderated by:
Nicole Goldin
Director, Youth Prosperity and Security Initative, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Thursday, March 14, 2013 3:00pm-4:30pm
B1 Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K. St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to ppd@csis.org
Young people have historically been at the forefront of social and political movements. In Kenya, youth make up nearly 30% of the population, and are a source of great promise. Yet fueled by disenfranchisement, inequity, and rampant unemployment, youth were at the center of the violence following the 2007 Presidential elections. To begin to address the challenge of disaffected youth, USAID initiated its largest-ever youth program – Yes Youth Can!. Implemented by Mercy Corps and led by Kenyan youth, the Yes Youth Can! project is forging new ground in understanding and advancing youth inclusive democracy and governance.
Following the March 4th elections, please join us for a timely conversation on project, policy and comparative experiences, perspectives and lessons learned from Kenya in building youth inclusive democracies.
Follow @CSIS and #CSISLive for live updates
Programs
PACIFIC FORUM CSIS, PROJECT ON PROSPERITY AND DEVELOPMENT

Building Youth-Inclusive Democracies: Lessons from Kenya
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
In partnership with the International Youth Foundation
THURSDAY, MAR 14, 2013
A discussion with:
Earl Gast
Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development
Zipporah Maina
President, Cheptiret Youth Bunge
Silas Maru
President, National Youth Bunge Association
Sharon Morris
Director of Youth and Conflict Mitigation, Mercy Corps
Moderated by:
Nicole Goldin
Director, Youth Prosperity and Security Initative, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Thursday, March 14, 2013 3:00pm-4:30pm
B1 Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K. St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to ppd@csis.org
Young people have historically been at the forefront of social and political movements. In Kenya, youth make up nearly 30% of the population, and are a source of great promise. Yet fueled by disenfranchisement, inequity, and rampant unemployment, youth were at the center of the violence following the 2007 Presidential elections. To begin to address the challenge of disaffected youth, USAID initiated its largest-ever youth program – Yes Youth Can!. Implemented by Mercy Corps and led by Kenyan youth, the Yes Youth Can! project is forging new ground in understanding and advancing youth inclusive democracy and governance.
Following the March 4th elections, please join us for a timely conversation on project, policy and comparative experiences, perspectives and lessons learned from Kenya in building youth inclusive democracies.
Follow @CSIS and #CSISLive for live updates
Programs
PACIFIC FORUM CSIS, PROJECT ON PROSPERITY AND DEVELOPMENT