Home » Green Economics » Trends in B2C green energy marketing – Market Research Report On Aarkstore Enterprise

Trends in B2C green energy marketing – Market Research Report On Aarkstore Enterprise

Get 50% discount on this report (15 November 2010 TO 15 January 2011)

Introduction

National and EU governments are now showing the level of commitment to the green energy sector that would encourage the development and marketing of green retail energy tariffs. There is scope for suppliers to boost their green energy sales by filling a growing gap in the marketplace as green regulations increasingly take hold.

Scope

*Ten years of renewable power generation data for the USA, Europe, East / Southeast Asia, Oceania and South Asia.

*A detailed review of European consumer perceptions about climate change and the way in which these could be leveraged by utilities.

*A review of some of the significant efforts in green tariff marketing: in the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Australia.

*A review of some of the world’s most pioneering green programs and how best practices can help offset current market structure limitations.

Highlights

Legislation and green awareness have spurred the generation of renewable power, led by EU Member States. Governments play a crucial role in making green energy economically viable, by stimulating the supply side, yet the green B2C market remains very much a marginal part of the power industry and has achieved a fraction of its true potential.

Green tariffs will remain peripheral where suppliers only market them at a premium. Residential customers need reassurances that they are actually buying real green power. Excessively pushing the environmental angle may breed customer cynicism and be counterproductive. Pioneers of green programs have learned to stay clear of these pitfalls.

Green energy is subject to the economic needs of stakeholders and their wider regulatory constraints, yet the growing issue of climate change now provides suppliers with opportunities in selling green energy. For now, utilities can overcome market structure limitations by deploying best practices that centre on price, product and promotion.

Reasons to Purchase

*Determine how utilities can lobby governments and amend their own internal product management operations to sustainably boost green B2C sales.

*Determine what consumers are willing to do to fight climate change, what products and services they are likely to take up and at what additional cost.

*Understand how and why certain providers and countries are fairing much better than others in their efforts to market green energy.

Table of Contents :

DATAMONITOR VIEW 1
CATALYST 1
SUMMARY 1
METHODOLGY 1
SOURCES 2
ANALYSIS 3
Environmental issues are taking centre stage across world energy markets 3
To date, the global market for green energy tariffs has been driven by three main factors 3
Interest in protecting the world’s environment has increased dramatically, presenting new opportunities for B2C green tariffs 4
The emergence of green retail tariffs is a response to the liberalization of electricity and gas markets worldwide 5
The Kyoto Protocol instigated a political movement that drove the uptake of large-scale renewable power worldwide 6
Renewable energy directives worldwide have sparked the adaptation of numerous legal frameworks (1/2) 7
Renewable energy directives worldwide have since sparked the adaptation of numerous legal frameworks (2/2) 8
Legislation and green awareness have spurred the strong uptake of renewable power on the supply side, led by EU Member States 9
Globally, key renewable energy indicators have shown dramatic gains over the past three years – a trend which is likely to continue 10
Consumers will change their habits provided utilities offer them the means and incentives to do so 11
More than half of Europeans feel informed about climate change 11
Europeans deem climate change to be a very serious issue and one of the most serious problems facing the world 12
Climate change is perceived as a serious problem, but one which European citizens are willing to address 13
A significant proportion of Europeans citizens are willing to pay more for green energy 14
Green tariffs linked to the reduction of energy consumption in the home demonstrate great comparative potential 15
Genuine concern about climate change does not always result in remedial actions with tangible green benefits 16
Where electricity prices are much higher than the EU average, citizens are less willing to pay for green energy 17
Europeans citizens believe that the different stakeholders aren’t doing enough to fight climate change 18
Green tariffs could help meet the expectations that citizens have of corporations and industry 19
A review of countries involved in green tariff marketing suggests lessons are to be learned in the US 20
In the US’ partly deregulated electricity market, three types of green power retail offerings coexist 20
Despite the economic downturn, US utilities significantly expanded green power sales at a national level 21
Utility green energy sales in the US continue to make up an increasing part of total retail electricity sales 22
More US consumers are making clean power choices than ever before 23
The success of US green tariffs is attributed to persistent and creative marketing strategies and a falling premium 24
US green power markets will continue growing but state RPS requirements threaten to alter market dynamics 25
In the UK, the disjuncture between green wholesale and green supply is caused by the Renewables Obligation 26
In the UK, the disjuncture between green wholesale and green supply is caused by the Renewables Obligation 26
Of the five types of ‘green’ tariffs offered by suppliers in the UK in 2008, some were much ‘greener’ than others 27
Of the five types of ‘green’ tariffs offered by suppliers in the UK in 2008, some were much ‘greener’ than others 28
In 2008, most ‘green’ energy tariffs suffered from a lack of transparency and clarity. 29
In September 2009, there are less green source and green fund tariffs than at the same time in 2008 30
In the UK, there is still no impartial green tariffs accreditation or audit scheme to substantiate supplier’s claims 30
In Germany, green energy tariffs are actively being promoted as an alternative and way of curbing unpopular nuclear and coal power 31
Green tariffs are mainstream in the Netherlands but incoming EU legislation could unsettle high rates of take-up 32
The success of Australia’s green tariff program hinges on liberalized energy markets and a strong accreditation program 34
Pioneering green retail programs highlight the elements central to any successful green tariff strategy 35
Palo Alto has created one of the most effective and successfully marketed green power programs in the US (1/2) 35
Palo Alto has created one of the most effective and successfully marketed green power programs in the US (2/2) 35
Ecotricity has positioned itself as a semi-green, sustainable, non-premium, small and credible energy company 36
Green Energy UK differentiated itself by only supplying ‘deep green’ or ‘pale green’ electricity 37
Good energy’s has positioned itself as the UK’s greenest and only 100% true ‘deep’ green energy supplier 38
British Gas offers two 100% green tariffs: Future Energy and Zero Carbon, both at a price premium 39
Bounce Energy offer fixed rate for their 100% renewable energy and a modern and rewarding marketing program 40
The deployment of best practices can offset many of the B2C renewable energy market structure limitations 41
Regional, national, and international policies drive the market for green energy, mainly from the supply-side 41
Green energy is subject to the economic needs of stakeholders and their wider regulatory constraints 42
Green energy providers are increasingly scrutinized and held to account by their customers and industry 43
Utilities must create new ‘low hanging fruit’ by driving the adoption of renewable energy, by partnership 43
Beyond government legislation, best practices in green tariff marketing centre on price, product and promotion 45
The successful sale of utility green energy tariffs must focus on five key elements of strategy 45
The burden is on utilities to lobby governments and amend their own internal product management operations 47
APPENDIX 48
Footnotes 48
Graphs of US green pricing program renewable energy sales and US price premium charged for new renewable power – footnotes: 48
Graph of US green pricing program renewable energy sales 48
Graph of US green power sales as a percentage of total retail sales 48
Graph of US customer participation rate 49
Graph of US price premium charged for new renewable power 49
Ask the analyst 50
Datamonitor consulting 50
Disclaimer 50

For more information please visit :

http://www.aarkstore.com/reports/Trends-in-B2C-green-energy-marketing-33242.html

We specialize in providing online market business information on market research reports, books, magazines, conference booking at competitive prices, and strive to provide excellent and innovative service to our customers.

Article from articlesbase.com

Learn more about David Gottfried here: www.ecospeakers.com Excerpts from a keynote address at Stanford University by David Gottfried, founder and first staff president of the US Green Building Council (USGBC), the leading green building organization in the world. In this segment, Gottfried talks about how green principles are being linked to the bottom line. He discusses how sustainability is positively affecting the building industry and real estate investment, with the potential for greening on a major scale. Gottfried has more than two decades of multidisciplinary experience as a real estate developer, construction manager, and sustainable development management consultant. As the President of Regenerative Ventures, he has consulted for both government and business. Public sector clients have included the State of California, the cities of San Diego and Santa Monica, and the US Navy. Business clients have included Starbucks, Williams-Sonoma, DreamWorks, Genentech, San Diego Gas & Electric, Yahoo, Johnson Controls, and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Architects. More green building, materials, and design related speakers here: www.ecospeakers.com

Posted in Green Economics and tagged as , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.