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MSc International Rural Development

The International Rural Development MSc is designed to develop the necessary professional understanding, skills and attitudes required to deliver sustainable…

Stefan Dercon: social protection and public works

Stefan Dercon – Chief Economist, UK Department for International Development (DfID) and Professor of Development Economics, University of Oxford – discusses …

Q&A: Does anybody know any good Humnanitarian training to help in developing countries?

Question by Sojourner: Does anybody know any good Humnanitarian training to help in developing countries?
I don’t want to go to a college but training programs. I want to help the forgotten and get to know them. Help people improve their lives and spirits. Missionary work is a big possibility for me aswell. I want a life of adventure. Any training schools you suggest? Like an all in one training? Hope it’s not hard.

Best answer:

Answer by Adan
Try this website. This is an excellent training program for missionaries. The program you are interested in is Globalworx. Ask for Fr. Aidan http://www.vrcusa.com/SJS/Welcome.html

What do you think? Answer below!

National Archives – ISRAEL/U.S. International development cooperation agency(10/01/1979) 2/2

Dr Helen Pankhurst, granddaughter of Sylvia Pankhurst international development and women’s rights campaigner Emily Wilding Davison Memorial Campaign Launch Firebox 29 11 12

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Cool International Development Policy images

Check out these International development policy images:

Building Youth-Inclusive Democracies: Lessons from Kenya
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
In partnership with the International Youth Foundation
THURSDAY, MAR 14, 2013
A discussion with:
Earl Gast
Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development
Zipporah Maina
President, Cheptiret Youth Bunge
Silas Maru
President, National Youth Bunge Association
Sharon Morris
Director of Youth and Conflict Mitigation, Mercy Corps
Moderated by:
Nicole Goldin
Director, Youth Prosperity and Security Initative, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Thursday, March 14, 2013 3:00pm-4:30pm
B1 Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K. St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to ppd@csis.org
Young people have historically been at the forefront of social and political movements. In Kenya, youth make up nearly 30% of the population, and are a source of great promise. Yet fueled by disenfranchisement, inequity, and rampant unemployment, youth were at the center of the violence following the 2007 Presidential elections. To begin to address the challenge of disaffected youth, USAID initiated its largest-ever youth program – Yes Youth Can!. Implemented by Mercy Corps and led by Kenyan youth, the Yes Youth Can! project is forging new ground in understanding and advancing youth inclusive democracy and governance.
Following the March 4th elections, please join us for a timely conversation on project, policy and comparative experiences, perspectives and lessons learned from Kenya in building youth inclusive democracies.
Follow @CSIS and #CSISLive for live updates
Programs
PACIFIC FORUM CSIS, PROJECT ON PROSPERITY AND DEVELOPMENT

Building Youth-Inclusive Democracies: Lessons from Kenya
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
In partnership with the International Youth Foundation
THURSDAY, MAR 14, 2013
A discussion with:
Earl Gast
Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development
Zipporah Maina
President, Cheptiret Youth Bunge
Silas Maru
President, National Youth Bunge Association
Sharon Morris
Director of Youth and Conflict Mitigation, Mercy Corps
Moderated by:
Nicole Goldin
Director, Youth Prosperity and Security Initative, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Thursday, March 14, 2013 3:00pm-4:30pm
B1 Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K. St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to ppd@csis.org
Young people have historically been at the forefront of social and political movements. In Kenya, youth make up nearly 30% of the population, and are a source of great promise. Yet fueled by disenfranchisement, inequity, and rampant unemployment, youth were at the center of the violence following the 2007 Presidential elections. To begin to address the challenge of disaffected youth, USAID initiated its largest-ever youth program – Yes Youth Can!. Implemented by Mercy Corps and led by Kenyan youth, the Yes Youth Can! project is forging new ground in understanding and advancing youth inclusive democracy and governance.
Following the March 4th elections, please join us for a timely conversation on project, policy and comparative experiences, perspectives and lessons learned from Kenya in building youth inclusive democracies.
Follow @CSIS and #CSISLive for live updates
Programs
PACIFIC FORUM CSIS, PROJECT ON PROSPERITY AND DEVELOPMENT

Building Youth-Inclusive Democracies: Lessons from Kenya
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies
In partnership with the International Youth Foundation
THURSDAY, MAR 14, 2013
A discussion with:
Earl Gast
Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development
Zipporah Maina
President, Cheptiret Youth Bunge
Silas Maru
President, National Youth Bunge Association
Sharon Morris
Director of Youth and Conflict Mitigation, Mercy Corps
Moderated by:
Nicole Goldin
Director, Youth Prosperity and Security Initative, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Thursday, March 14, 2013 3:00pm-4:30pm
B1 Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K. St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to ppd@csis.org
Young people have historically been at the forefront of social and political movements. In Kenya, youth make up nearly 30% of the population, and are a source of great promise. Yet fueled by disenfranchisement, inequity, and rampant unemployment, youth were at the center of the violence following the 2007 Presidential elections. To begin to address the challenge of disaffected youth, USAID initiated its largest-ever youth program – Yes Youth Can!. Implemented by Mercy Corps and led by Kenyan youth, the Yes Youth Can! project is forging new ground in understanding and advancing youth inclusive democracy and governance.
Following the March 4th elections, please join us for a timely conversation on project, policy and comparative experiences, perspectives and lessons learned from Kenya in building youth inclusive democracies.
Follow @CSIS and #CSISLive for live updates
Programs
PACIFIC FORUM CSIS, PROJECT ON PROSPERITY AND DEVELOPMENT

Network Governance and the Development Potential of Middle-Income Countries

Some cool International development policy images:

Network Governance and the Development Potential of Middle-Income Countries
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies

Network Governance and the Development Potential of Middle-Income Countries
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies

Network Governance and the Development Potential of Middle-Income Countries
International development policy
Image by CSIS: Center for Strategic & International Studies

Making Sense Expands to the East Coast Opening an Office in Boston

Making Sense Expands to the East Coast Opening an Office in Boston











Making Sense Opens an Office in Boston


San Antonio, Texas (PRWEB) July 23, 2013

Seeking to maximize high quality services to world class clients Making Sense has opened an office in Boston, Massachusetts. The opening of the Boston office and expansion East follows the company’s recent hiring of Robert Matthews as the company’s VP of Business Development to introduce the Nearshore hybrid delivery model for Microsoft .NET, mobile applications and UX services from Argentina.

In Making Sense’s new office in Boston, Robert is responsible of new business development, strategic management, sales, and entrepreneurship. He maintains constant meetings with Making Sense’s direct clients and strategic alliance partners like Microsoft, that can extend the reach of the company into the U.S.

Rob also leverages his experience and knowledge of the outsourcing market to raise awareness for the benefits of the Nearshore model. The main benefits of this model are same time zone, cultural affinity and access to top tier talent. In many cases proximity allows for similar lifestyles, customs and styles of communications. Finally, it is also important to mention that this model promotes easiness in interaction between companies. Those Agile projects that demand constant communication with the outsourcing partner can easily take place due to similar working hours.

The presence of a Boston office “will enable us to serve a wide range of companies that use Microsoft .NET technologies from Fortune 1000 companies to innovative start-ups and the funding Venture Capital firms that the Boston area is so well known for,” said Matthews. “Helping our clients pivot to rapidly change a product offering or introduce a new feature to the market is how we provide our customers the competitive advantage they need,” added Matthews. Some of the firm’s notable clients include Dell, AMD and Rackspace.

Since it was founded in 2006, Making Sense has dedicated its efforts to offering excellent software strategic services, as means of creating long and lasting relationships between companies and their clients. The company is strongly committed to create applications and products that are enjoyable for users and profitable for partners implementing cutting edge technologies.

“We are excited to be opening an office in Boston that will allow us to be closer to customers on the East coast,” said Cesar DOnofrio, CEO of Making Sense. “We have seen that offering nearshore same time zone service combined with an onsite customer relationship and project management teams is a new and refreshing option for clients that historically only used offshoring development work in India and other parts of Asia.”

Recently, Making Sense was chosen by the Chamber of Software and IT Services Companies of Argentina (CESSI), as IT representative to the new United States ArgenTIna IT office in Austin, Texas. Nancy Medica, Making Sense’s Communications and Marketing Manager is the new Delegate who is now serving as an important communications, policy, and membership link between all the companies who are part of the International Network of IT businesses.

The city of Boston was chosen as the home of the new office due to Making Sense’s initiative of better serving existing clients who are in the Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey area. The company is determined to offer its clients the possibility to have constant, in-person meetings visiting the new office located at One Boston Place without having the necessity to travel to the South Central Part of the United States

On the other hand, the city of Boston is known for its high standards in education and the talent of its graduates. The city is home to Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University, established in 1861 and one of United States’s private universities with a strong emphasis on scientific, engineering, and technological education and research.engineering and exact sciences. Moreover, Harvard University is one of the most prestigious institutions for IT careers throughout the country and is also in the city. Boston is also a city known worldwide for capturing innovative entrepreneurs and tech innovators like Monster Worldwide, Bose Corp. and Staples.com, which is second only to Amazon as the nation’s largest, Internet retailer.

Massachusetts, together with New York and New Jersey in the East Coast welcome thousands of entrepreneurs who attend different international forums and conferences each year. Among the most renowned forums, we can name the World BPO/ITO Forum that takes place in New York and brings both strategic and operational issues to the fore while providing solutions to address the needs of CIOs, CFOs, CEOs and executive teams.

By settling in Boston, Making Sense is looking forward to helping build a stronger critical mass of brand-name tech companies in the city, and improve on newly emerging tech opportunities including cloud computing, and mobile tech.

Making Sense is constantly renewing its essence of offering high quality services and maintaining its unique spirit of passion and dedication that it brings to the pursuit of technical excellence.

About Making Sense

Making Sense is an IT company specializing in the development and implementation of software and web applications for different companies since 2006. It has over 120 employees who work in different offices located in United States, Argentina and Mexico.

The company specializes in offering the latest software development strategies, and has several partners throughout the world. Some of its most prominent clients include Rackspace, DELL and AMD. One of Making Sense’s most well-known products include Doppler™, the most widely used email marketing tool in Latin America, which allows users to create, send, analyze and optimize the user’s email marketing campaigns very simply, fast and effective; and Lander™, a tool that enables the creation of landing pages in minutes.

In recognition for its work in fostering Argentina IT outsourcing to the U.S., Making Sense received in December 2012 a special mention at the Polo IT Buenos Aires event. The company was also chosen by the Chamber of Software and IT Services Companies of Argentina (CESSI), as IT representative to the new United States ArgenTIna IT office in Austin, Texas.

Making Sense is constantly renewing its essence of offering high quality services and maintaining its unique spirit of passion and dedication that it brings to the pursuit of technical excellence.

Contact:

Making Sense LLC

Robert Matthews

Business Development

210-807-3552

rmatthews(at)makingsense(dot)com











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Related International Development Policy Press Releases

What is the point of the military reading lists?

Question by The Questioner: What is the point of the military reading lists?
Like how they suggest you read books like starship troopers, or Tin Can Sailors (I’m using the Navy version of the reading list) and the books change for certain ranks. So what is it for? And why are the suggested books different for different ranks?

Best answer:

Answer by Wine, wine U dirty skunk
Because professional development is a lifelong process…and professional reading..along with PME (professional military education…i.e. NCO and Officer Schools) and civilian education is all a part of that process. Just like a professional in the civilian world..you never stop learning and developing. The minute you do you fall behind your peers..which in the military means getting passed over for promotion and shown the door.

You will notice that the books for more senior ranks concern subjects like international policy and operations at the strategic levels of war. The junior levels look at the more immediate like ethics, history, leadership and operations at the company/battalion level and below. You can’t expect an 18 year old private to comprehend or put into practice the same things a Colonel will read.

Btw..”Starship Troopers” is one of the best books on military ethics ever written. You should read it if you haven’t. The stupid a$ $ movie did that book a HUGE injustice. The author, I am sure, is rolling in his grave. Kind of like “300” did to Gates of Fire. Horrible.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!